5 things we learned from England's ODI series defeat in India

Here, Press Association Sport looks at five points to take away from the games.

ENGLAND'S BATTING IS UP WITH THE BEST

The shift in England's limited-overs batting since the 2015 World Cup has been a joy to watch and, despite defeat, this series has been another example of the comfort with which they now pursue big totals. Racking up 350 in Pune and 366 in Cuttack may not have been enough to see off the hosts on benign pitches with short boundaries but no England team has ever scored more against India. Even better was their 321 in a winning cause at Eden Gardens on a tricky, seam-friendly strip. England's trump card in this summer's Champions Trophy is their increasingly consistent firepower.

RASHID STILL A RIDDLE

Most pundits would have expected leg-spinner Adil Rashid to play all three matches in Indian conditions, leading the tourists' hunt for wickets. Instead he managed just five inconsistent overs in the opener before being dropped for the last two. The feeling remains the Yorkshireman is a confidence player prone to troughs of form and the hints were there with two loose showings in the warm-up matches. At his best he lends the attack mystery and variation and careful consideration must be given on how best to manage him.

MORGAN HAS SETTLED CAPTAINCY QUESTIONS

After a lean 2016 and his decision to miss the Bangladesh tour on security grounds, Eoin Morgan faced some scrutiny over his position in the build-up to the series. But he has been welcomed back wholeheartedly by the squad, who appear to value his presence more than many armchair critics, and his valiant century in pursuit of a huge target in the second ODI confirmed he can still cut it in a rapidly evolving format.

ROOM FOR A BOLTER

Fitness and reasonable form allowing, England probably know around 13 of their first-choice 15 for the Champions Trophy. The area most open to new arrivals is the bowling attack, with only Chris Woakes really looking entirely on top of his game and established among the seam unit. David Willey, Jake Ball and Liam Plunkett are the men in possession but others have a chance to break in, with Stuart Broad eyeing a white-ball recall, Mark Wood a likely selection if fully fit and Chris Jordan on the edges of the squad.

INDIA MEAN BUSINESS

A lot of blocks are falling into place for India's one-day team as they eye another limited-overs trophy this summer. Virat Kohli has finally assumed the captaincy from Mahendra Singh Dhoni and his energetic, sharply focused brand of leadership could come into its own at tournament time. Dhoni and fellow veteran Yuvraj Singh proved with their 256-run stand in Cuttack they are still match-winners and the likes of Kedar Jadhav, Jasprit Bumrah and Hardik Pandya all played key roles when required.

  Ben Stokes scored an unbeaten half-century as England beat India on Sunday
Ben Stokes scored an unbeaten half-century as England beat India on Sunday